Geting paid  

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Jenny Stokes
(@jenny-stokes)
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03/05/2019 5:37 pm  

Just stumbled upon this TED talk this morning. I like the way he describes the industry at the start

 

http://evansandstokes.com
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Gary E. Andrews
(@gary-e-andrews)
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31/05/2019 10:52 am  

Quite interesting Jen. Having product you can send out to the entire planetary population, living in places you will never go, and places you will go, and finding 'consumers' there, has become a possible and viable modus operandi for commerce. Meaning you can draw money back to you from those people in those places. It is 'doable'.
I used to think I only wanted my solo performance in the recording because that's all I could reproduce live. Now I see that I don't have to be limited by that. I could have a large orchestral arrangement and send that out to the world and, if I could find the audience, or get them to find me, I might never be expected to perform it, orchestrally, live.

The market exists. We are 'the market' for art. We've all bought 'art', stacks of CDs, vinyls, cassettes. So we know the market exists. Getting product in the form in which the market desires and demands to consume it, and getting it out to be discovered, is doable. Nike. Just do it. Just doable it.

Quite interesting.

Despite 1,000's of years of Songwriting humans have not exhausted the possibilities. There will always be another Song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? www.garyeandrews.com


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Jenny Stokes
(@jenny-stokes)
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Posts: 413
31/05/2019 4:26 pm  

....and challenging  

http://evansandstokes.com
https://www.facebook.com/evansandstokes/


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Mabbo
(@mabbo)
A Night To ReMember
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10/06/2019 9:28 am  

Actually, probably the biggest takeaway from things like this are that the main people making any money from music and art are those that are giving speeches about making money from music and art. Many of the sites he is talking about are now having their own problems with revenue, as more and more people find out about them, more cut into the competition and other sites have to open up.

Interestingly, in this country we have a huge successful television show called "SHARK TANK." It is always several mega successful business people, being presented investment ideas for them to invest their money in. I rarely watch it since so much of my life has been around those kinds of things, My Dad Was an entrepreneur, building businesses. But tuned in a little last night and they had a guy doing a web site, very similar to what this guy is talking about. They shot it down quickly, as they always do anything involved with music. One of the worst investments there are. 

In music and art, while you approach it from a business perspective, you have to really understand that it is not a great monetary opportunity. Never quit your day job. Do music for the right reasons, because you love to do it. Let the money follow if you can engineer enough people interested in what you do. Work on your product first. 

That would be my advice to anyone trying to do this.
MAB

Marc-Alan Barnette


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Jenny Stokes
(@jenny-stokes)
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Posts: 413
11/06/2019 4:21 am  

Marc!! Haven't heard from you in weeks. Been busy I imagine. I hope all's well with you. How did the video-making go? Was it fun? Fruitful? And, speaking of fruits, when do we see the harvest?  😊

http://evansandstokes.com
https://www.facebook.com/evansandstokes/


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Mabbo
(@mabbo)
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Posts: 186
11/06/2019 8:25 am  

Hey Jenny, Jenny, Jenny,

Sorry I've been gone. I really haven't, didn't realize that I was not logged in and getting no notices on people talking about me. Japov had one and there were others, I just didn't see it. I do check and if there is something I can contribute to, I try to. If there are subjects I don't know about, I tend to steer away from them. I stay in my own lane. 

I can say that when it comes to "GETTING PAID" at this, if you want to get a lot of activity around you, tell people you DON'T want to do it anymore. Over the past year or so, I've been sort of in a "busy semi-retirement." LOL! I have backed away from a lot of gigs, simply because I don't really want to do them. But I am continually asked to do different things, so some I do, some I don't. 
The videos are doing fine. Have filmed both of them in two different weeks, but the crew I have used are involved in several other things, so I am sort of at their mercy. The filming is done, but the editing goes on for a while. Everything comes down to editing. Fortunately, there is not a rush on them, so I'm not under pressure. The whole reason I am doing is to "practice what I preach." In today's world we all have to represent ourselves in a lot of ways. musically, business wise and visually. I have to council artists that they HAVE to have video because you never know where things end up now. Everything gets on YOU TUBE, FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM,  and various web sites. You never know who is going to see what you do and what they are going to ask you for.

I have a friend who is doing quite a lot of things in Europe. Spain, France, The UK. He has hit a mother lode vein of festivals and is in a huge new shot in his career. He is trying to get me into that, and the videos are one part for some booking in those areas. No matter how I try to keep from being an artist they keep pushing me back into it, LOL! So who knows. If you want to do this, have good product that looks and sounds good, represents you well, and then see where it goes. 

I did what will be my "LAST CD" last year, and had quite a good time doing that. Recording my songs the way I like them, with a full horn section and more of a throwback to the Muscle shoals and Stax record days, than any modern  country thing, so these videos are part of that. One, as a matter of fact, is going to be me in the present, and using "flashbacks" of a show we did last year. So it should be interesting. I've grown some of my hair back, and a beard now, so it should be quite the time leap. I shaved my head 7 years ago in solidarity to a 14 year old girl I was working with who was going through Chemo, so it's weird to have it coming back and of course, now that I'm 60, coming out white. Life's funny.

What the guy in this video is saying is very much what I've tried to explain all along. The music industry now is very much do it yourself. You have to find your own niche in it, and find ways to make that niche work for you. There is still a mainstream music business, and for many of us, it gets weirder and weirder and farther away from what our version of "whatever" is. So we either adapt or die. 

For musicians and artists, the gigs started drying out, so everyone went digital. Then every one was going digital, musicians went to house concerts and other ways to monetize what they do, then everyone started doing that. People did downloading, and that was very strong. Then streaming came in and that income started going away. Now, a lot of people are using the net out of their homes and doing live performance for their fans and for more things, and that is working for some, but getting over saturated now too. Who knows what is coming next?
But I will tell you it will always be harder and harder because there are just so many people doing it. When it takes literally no skill to do something, and anyone can put what they do "out there." It will be harder and harder to make money at it. When everyone can do something, there is not a lot of incentive to pay for anything. That is why you have to make yourself the product and increase your value by doing something others don't do as well. The more technologically we are connected, the farther away most people get from reality and the personal touch. So if you want to "get paid" make sure people get to know YOU and what YOU do. A professional career is when people pay YOU for being YOU. 

It's so funny. I once wrote a booklet called "FRESHMAN YEAR IN NASHVILLE" about people moving to town. The problem with writing any book is that the minute you finish it, technology changes and your book is out of date. So I mostly just do things like this site and a few others and whatever else I find to do. Always something to try. 

Oh well, enough about me. and what's going on. Sorry I've been away, but all you have to do is call my name and I tend to show up. Take care and see you later.
MAB

This post was modified 3 months ago 2 times by Mabbo

Marc-Alan Barnette


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Jenny Stokes
(@jenny-stokes)
Honorable Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 413
11/06/2019 3:15 pm  
Posted by: Mabbo

....The whole reason I am doing is to "practice what I preach." In today's world we all have to represent ourselves in a lot of ways. musically, business wise and visually. I have to council artists that they HAVE to have video because you never know where things end up now. Everything gets on YOU TUBE, FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM,  and various web sites. You never know who is going to see what you do and what they are going to ask you for.

....

What the guy in this video is saying is very much what I've tried to explain all along. The music industry now is very much do it yourself. You have to find your own niche in it, and find ways to make that niche work for you. There is still a mainstream music business, and for many of us, it gets weirder and weirder and farther away from what our version of "whatever" is. So we either adapt or die. 

....

But I will tell you it will always be harder and harder because there are just so many people doing it. When it takes literally no skill to do something, and anyone can put what they do "out there." It will be harder and harder to make money at it. When everyone can do something, there is not a lot of incentive to pay for anything. That is why you have to make yourself the product and increase your value by doing something others don't do as well. The more technologically we are connected, the farther away most people get from reality and the personal touch. So if you want to "get paid" make sure people get to know YOU and what YOU do. A professional career is when people pay YOU for being YOU. 

John has been saying that I need to be more seen by my "fans" (all two of them - lol). He's always  posting video to social media, but I'm a rare one to do that (even though I do post stuff, it's usually not video). I have never been a fan of cameras so I find it very much out of my comfort zone. But, of course, I know he and you are very right. So, in the interests of doing what I know I must, we made a video. Painful? Yes. But I'll try to do them more regularly. What do you think about putting a spoken word or two directed at listeners after a music video? Good idea or overdone?  

J

http://evansandstokes.com
https://www.facebook.com/evansandstokes/


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Mabbo
(@mabbo)
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11/06/2019 5:35 pm  

Hey Jenny.

I know what you mean. Both my fans say I have a "face for radio." So video is not always my friend. But it is part of what we have to do now. It is the same as when lyric only or music only people ask "can I submit my lyrics or music to publishers or record labels?" 
The answer is "NO" because they deal only in full, complete songs. Unless they are doing poetry for lyrics or music only for instrumentals, they simply don't have the finished product and they have to get that finished first before they can do anything.

Anyone now who is doing any form of artist, performing, recording, a writer trying to get to artists, or anyone in the teaching field, have to involved VISUAL elements as videos as much as the recording of audio. We live in a visual world and again it is ADAPT OR DIE.

I'm not sure what you are asking about "spoken word" after a music video. If you are talking about a camera phone video with you doing something live without special effects, studio recording, etc. it is expected to have some spoken word. That is actually like a personal conversation you are having with your viewers/listeners. 
If you are talking about an actual "MUSIC VIDEO" as in multiple camera shots, a story line and script, etc. that would probably be unneeded afterward. If your song and video can[t do the talking for you, you probably should do more work on that first instead of saying anything after it is over. 

Video is just another "necessary evil. Most of us don't feel that comfortable, actually most writers and even a lot of artists are introverts, so they don't really like seeing themselves on video, they don't really like to hear themselves their voices, etc. It's why ut is a good idea to have other points of view on anything we do. 

A few years ago, I decided to do an "official music video." I did it for a few different reasons.

#1. Songwriting techniques. The song, "LESS IS MORE" was written with one of my student/clients, and was written to show him how to say more with less words. He loved the "old grooves" of Motown in the 60's and 70's. He had nothing like that in his catalog so it was a good reason to "show, not tell" what he could do.

#2. STUDIO TECHNIQUE.
For over 20 years, I've recorded in JAY'S PLACE recording studio on Music Row. I've recorded around 1500 songs there, many many guitar vocals, level II's, (a little production), and "full up" songs that feature all the bells and whistles. We have great musicians and the studio is a great experience. So we wanted to show that. Also, how we take songs from guitar and vocals, to pre-production, doing the charting, and all the things that make a recording go smoothly.

#3. BOB BABBITT and TOMMY WELLS.
Bob Babbitt was one of the most famous bass players in the world. He was one of the "FUNK BROTHERS", which was the Motown house band through the 60's and 70's. He played on hundreds of hits for Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, Four Tops, and many more before he went to Philadelphia and sounds like the "SPINNERS" and many more of the "Philadelphia sound" of the 70's. I got to know him through a documentary called "STANDING IN THE SHADOWS OF MOTOWN" which told the story of the Funk Brothers and the success of Motown. I loved that documentary and one day found myself standing behind him in line at a restaurant. I struck up a conversation and tried not to be a geek. I happened to ask him if he still recorded and he said "Sure, if I like the song."

Well a month later, he liked the song and we filmed him in what would turn out to be his last video taped performance. Also on it was Tommy Wells, another Motown alum, who had made his way to Nashville with southern rock legends, Wet Willie. Tommy had played on hundreds of my recordings and thousands in the studio. It turned out it was his last recording as well. Both of these amazing guys were dead within a year after doing the video.

#4. THE VIDEO STUDIO.
The man who owned the video company, was a friend of Jay, the owner and was looking to do a short form music video to enter into film festivals to get his company around people that did financing for independent films. He put everything together and did a great job.

The result is the video won a "TELLY" award, which is done with television and independent filmmakers. That thing is heavy as heck and is sort of the "Oscar" in that division. Looks great on the mantle piece. Everyone involved got work. Me ,the studio, the video company, my student got a ton more gigs and writing appointments. So it all was a win win. 

That is what I look for in videos. I am not just trying to promote one or another song. It is about my teaching, my personal interaction with fans and friends, and overall practicing what I preach to others. And if you do it all well, hopefully people will pay you for what you do. 

MAB

Marc-Alan Barnette


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Mabbo
(@mabbo)
A Night To ReMember
Joined: 6 months ago
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11/06/2019 5:38 pm  

I am pretty sure I've done this before, but for people who are new around here, this is the video or "LESS IS MORE" that I just talked about. 

https://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video?fr=mcafee&p=You+tube%2C+Less+is+More%2C+Marc-Alan+Barnette#id=1&vid=4966e9cfa91f4874c91a53df69e8bbe9&action=click

Marc-Alan Barnette


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Jenny Stokes
(@jenny-stokes)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 413
11/06/2019 6:16 pm  

I have seen that wonderful video before, but I got so much more teaching out of it this time around knowing the backstory that goes with it. Thank you so much for sharing the tale, MAB.

http://evansandstokes.com
https://www.facebook.com/evansandstokes/


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