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Gary E. Andrews
(@gary-e-andrews)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 79
17/08/2019 3:08 am  
Tip of the Week: Little Details That Cause Big Problems
 
It's  not uncommon for artists to have 95% of the right pieces in place, but be stifled by not having that last 5%. Sometimes they are big things, like not having a website. But most often it's little details that cause the biggest problems. Here are a few of those details that can stop you in your tracks.
  • Not having contact information on everything. Every CD and CD cover, lyric sheet, social network profile, communication etc needs to have your complete contact information. Nothing is worse than getting someone's attention but they don't know how to contact you.
  • Inconsistent branding. You should use the exact same social network name on every platform so you are easy to find. It may take some work to find one that applies to you and is not taken by someone else,. But it's worth the trouble in order to be found easily and quickly. 
  • Improper business etiquette. There are countless examples of this, but here are 2. Most professionals will immediately delete an email from someone they don't know that begins with 'Hey'. Also, trying to 'sell' your act or music to someone before building even a small a relationship with them is often an immediate turn-off.
  • Not keeping your social profiles and website up to date. e.g. If your website or Bands in Town profile says your last gig was a year ago, I will assume you're not active or at least not performing any more.  And that might be far from the truth. 

    www.indieconnect.com

Despite 1,000's of years of Songwriting humans have not exhausted the possibilities. There will always be another Song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? www.garyeandrews.com


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NEIL COTTON
(@neil-cotton)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 72
17/08/2019 11:31 am  

This sounds like performing or recording artists...are there thing songwriters need to do to put them in the game.


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Gary E. Andrews
(@gary-e-andrews)
Sparkly Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 79
17/08/2019 2:27 pm  

As a Songwriter you may get permission to submit a Demonstration recording to a Publisher, an Artist and/or their management, a Record Label, a Music Library.
When it gets to them they may be as sloppy as the rest of us. They take out the CD, put it in the player, lay the case aside. They listen. The phone rings. The dog wants out. Their wife yells at them to take out the trash. While out in the yard the neighbor asks if they can recommend a good plumber. An hour later they come back in and the kids have used their desk to google "Why were cornflakes invented?" Everything's moved around. They hit 'Eject' and there's this disc with no information on it. What was it? Do I want to put it back in and listen to see what it was? Where's the case? There are several empty jewel cases laying there, and several other CD's. Is there information on the cases? Is there a paper insert with information? I think the guy's name was Neil...something...some kind of...fabric? Neil Chenielle? Neil Corduroy? Wife yells again. Dog wants out and it's too late now because you've got a mess to clean up Mister! It's YOUR dog. So all these unlabeled things get swept into the trash can because life is just too complex to play The Match Game. So you, the Songwriter, don't hear back from the guy. You contact him and he says, "Cotton! Neil Cotton! That was it! Couldn't think of it to save my ass!" , but rather than tell you that story, he just says, "Thanks, but No thanks!" because he's got this stack of jewelcases that just came in and he's hoping for a Solid Gold hit hidden in there somewhere. And then his wife yells.
Getting the Songwriter in the game:
#1. Write good Songs.
#2. Get a Demonstration Recording.
#3. Get permission to submit it to somebody who might take it to market, get it 'cut' and 'released', and put all your contact information on the CD, the jewelcase, the paper insert, the letter, the email, the website.
#4. Wait.

Despite 1,000's of years of Songwriting humans have not exhausted the possibilities. There will always be another Song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? www.garyeandrews.com


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NEIL COTTON
(@neil-cotton)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 72
17/08/2019 7:50 pm  

That's about what I understand....nice dog story LOL


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